Our Mission

The Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical Research is dedicated to providing financial support to offer highly qualified scientists the opportunity to pursue research into the causes and origins of cancer.

The goal of the Fund is to provide support to the brightest individual scientists pursuing careers in cancer research while promoting and emphasizing the value and contribution of the individual in keeping with the spirit of the conception of the Fund.

FINANCIAL REPORTS

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JCC FUND NEWSLETTERS
Check out our current and past newletters to find out about the newest JCCF fellows and what they are researching, details on our annual retreats, and other interesting articles.

2013 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2012 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2011 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >

2010 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2009 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2008 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2007 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2006 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2005 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >

We will accept referee and sponsor letters by email until February 15. Referees may send letters and ratings (from A to E) directly to us at letters@jccfund.org. Sponsor letters may also be sent to the same address. Please attach a PDF of your letter to the email.

Mansi Srivastava

Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research Cambridge, MA

Many animal species are able to regenerate missing body parts or even entire body plans. I am using molecular and genomic tools to study regeneration and learn whether regeneration mechanisms in various species were inherited from their common ancestor or if they have evolved independently. Discovering conserved mechanisms might reveal previously unknown but potentially critical aspects of regeneration in animals.

During college, I studied development, regeneration, and asexual reproduction in segmented worms. My graduate work focused on the genomes of early animal lineages such as sea anemones and sponges to learn about early animal evolution. Such comparative genomic analyses have allowed us to infer changes in gene content, gene structure, and genomic organization that accompanied the appearance of animals and their subsequent radiation into phyletic lineages. However, we don’t yet understand the functions of the genomic innovations unique to animals.  I am now studying the evolution of a particular biological process, focusing on how the functions of a few genes have evolved. For this research, I have returned to my interest in regeneration which, with the help of modern genetic tools, can be studied at molecular and cell biological levels in many species.

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