Our Mission

The Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical Research is dedicated to providing financial support to offer highly qualified scientists the opportunity to pursue research into the causes and origins of cancer.

The goal of the Fund is to provide support to the brightest individual scientists pursuing careers in cancer research while promoting and emphasizing the value and contribution of the individual in keeping with the spirit of the conception of the Fund.

FINANCIAL REPORTS

2008 FINANCIAL REPORT >
2007 FINANCIAL REPORT >

JCC FUND NEWSLETTERS
Check out our current and past newletters to find out about the newest JCCF fellows and what they are researching, details on our annual retreats, and other interesting articles.

2013 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2012 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2011 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >

2010 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2009 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2008 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2007 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2006 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >
2005 JCC FUND NEWSLETTER >

We will accept referee and sponsor letters by email until February 15. Referees may send letters and ratings (from A to E) directly to us at letters@jccfund.org. Sponsor letters may also be sent to the same address. Please attach a PDF of your letter to the email.

THE JANE COFFIN CHILDS FUND FELLOWS 2011 – 2014

FELLOW:
Michael T. Bethune
Division of Biology California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA

My research aims to identify prostate cancer-reactive T cell receptors and their cognate antigens, thereby enabling the design of novel TCR gene therapies and dendritic cell-targeted vaccines.  I am also using protein engineering to improve the safety and efficacy of T cell receptors in such therapies and to extend these therapies to other widely-prevalent cancers of epithelial origin.

My training began at the University of California, Davis, where I was introduced to biochemistry by my undergraduate mentor, Robert Fairclough.  After UC Davis, I spent two years in Washington D.C. before joining the Stanford Biochemistry Department as a graduate student.  There, I worked with my advisor, Chaitan Khosla, on celiac sprue, an autoimmune-like disease in which dietary gluten precipitates an inflammatory immune response in susceptible individuals.  This research piqued my interest in how immune responses are shaped by foreign material, and in the potential for using bacterial and viral vectors to augment immunity to pathogens and to mitigate autoimmunity.  As a deleterious self pathogen, cancer is a uniquely challenging target of this engineering immunity approach. When not working, I enjoy discovering new activities in the L.A. area with my wife, Carol San, who is an occupational therapist.

FELLOW:
Kivanç Birsoy
Whitehead Institute Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Current research: Cell autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms of cancer metabolisum regulation and tumor growth.

I grew up in Izmir,Turkey, and received my BS in molecular biology and genetics from Bilkent University and my PhD in molecular genetics from Rockefeller University.  At Rockefeller, I was a graduate student in Jeffrey Friedman's lab, studying development of fat tissue and regulation of the obesity hormone, leptin. My current post-doctoral work in David Sabatini's lab at Whitehead Institute involves studying mechanisms of cancer metabolism regulation. Outside of the lab, I am a big soccer fan. I also enjoy the outdoors, and spending time with friends and family. 

FELLOW:
Joshua Black
Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Charlestown, Massachusetts

I am studying how chromatin structure contributes to transcription, DNA replication, differentiation and maintaining genome stability.  My research is focused on how the JMJD2 family of histone tri-demethylases are involved in regulating these processes.

I received BS degrees in biology and chemistry/biochemistry from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where I became interested in understanding how the expression of genes was controlled to coordinate differentiation and development.   I received my PhD at UCLA where, in Michael Carey's laboratory, I developed a reconstituted chromatin system to begin to elucidate the biochemical events required prior to gene transcription.  My research uncovered an interaction between the critically important Mediator co-activator complex and the chromatin regulator p300. In post-doctoral work in the laboratory of Jonathan Whetstine, I am studying how the JMJD2 family of histone tri-demethylases regulates chromatin structure and gene expression.  I have uncovered an important role for one of these enzymes, JMJD2A, in DNA replication and cell cycle progression.  Since these enzymes are amplified in numerous cancers and important for maintaining genomic stability, this work has potential to lead to new cancer therapies.

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